Readings for Honors

HISP-S498 — spring 2023

Location
Multiple
Days and Times
Multiple
Course Description

Various topics.

CASE requirements vary.


Note: There are seven sections/topics.

HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                          LITERATURE
Variable Title: Cultural Icons of Spain

Prerequisite: HISP-S 328 or consent of department

What does it mean when a 21st-Century political leader dresses up as the medieval epic hero El Cid? Or when a contemporary photographer creates an installation in which she depicts herself as the 16th-Century Santa Teresa de Ávila? This course focuses on iconic historical figures and literary characters who continue to resonate in the 20th- and 21st-Century cultural imagination. Drawing on primary texts from the Middle Ages through the 17th Century, we will investigate these cultural icons and what they mean in contemporary times. Examples include the El Cid, Don Quixote, La Celestina, Saint Theresa, the pícaro (or antiheroic rogue), and Don Juan.

Readings will consist of classic works of Spanish literature, such as El Cantar de Mio Cid, La Celestina, El burlador de Sevilla (the first play about Don Juan) and selections from Don Quixote.  Assignments will focus on recent Spanish cultural productions and popular media, with students exploring the representation and transfigurations of these iconic figures.

The goals of this course are twofold: to introduce students to essential Spanish texts from earlier periods and to increase students’ cultural literacy and understanding of contemporary Spain, a nation constructed and imagined in part on this medieval and early modern foundation. Class discussion and assignments will be in Spanish.

This course carries CASE AH and CASE GCC distribution credit.

HISP-S 498 #31426     3:00P-4:15P        TR         GA 0007        Prof. Steven Wagschal

Note: For permission to take this class, e-mail kallgood@iu.edu  

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HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                              CULTURE
Variable Title:  SPAIN:  The Cultural Context

Prerequisite: One of HISP-S 324, HISP-S 328, HISP-S 331, HISP-S 333, or HISP-S 334

This course studies the globalization of Spain by examining the links between culture, politics and the economy in the contemporary period, beginning with the Civil War (1936-1939) but especially focusing on the post-Franco years (1975 to present). We will analyze literary works, movies, and architectural icons to understand the cultural challenges and social tensions of the process of globalization—or maybe Americanization—of the country. We will relate this process to the economic re-structuring of today’s Spain in its three main modes: as a key destination for global tourism (including study abroad programs!); as a site of investments of multinational companies; and as destination for many non-European immigrants needed as cheap labor. This re-structuring has caused serious territorial disputes over state power, and we will pay particular attention to the movement for secession in Catalonia. The goal of the course is to explore how the various cultures of Spain express some of the triumphs and the contradictions of the global world.

This course carries CASE AH and CASE GCC distribution credit.

HISP-S 498   #31429     8:00A-9:15A     TR        GA 0011       Prof. Edgar Illas

Note:  This class meets with HISP-S 411 #31194

Note:  For permission to take this class, e-mail kallgood@iu.edu   
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HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                              LITERATURE
Variable Title: Hispanic Culture in the U.S.

Prerequisite: One of HISP-S 324, HISP-S 328, HISP-S 331, HISP-S 333, or HISP-S 334

This course explores Latina/o/x culture in the United States from the 19th century until today. Through the close study of essays, novels, short stories, poems, plays, comics, film, advertising, and music, among other cultural objects, we will analyze a diverse body of Latina/o/x cultural production in relation to various socio-historical contexts. Among the topics we will cover are the representations of legendary resistance figures after the Mexican-American War, farm work and rural life, family and coming of age, language and identity, racial, ethnic, and political conflict, the creation and commodification of Latina/o/x identity, Latina/o/x popular culture, gender/sexuality, and immigration. In addition, students will further develop the concepts and skills necessary to analyze the particular ways in which different cultural texts produce meaning. 

This course carries CASE AH and CASE DUS distribution credit.

HISP-S 498   #31432      9:45A-11:00A     MW      BH 344      Prof. Andrés Guzmán

Note: This class meets with HISP-S 413 #31195

Note: For permission to take this class, e-mail kallgood@iu.edu   

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HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                               LITERATURE
Variable Title:  Modern Spanish-America Prose Fiction

Prerequisite: HISP-S 328 or equivalent.

In this course, we will study highlights in the trajectory of Spanish American and Caribbean prose fiction from the modernista movement of the late 1800s-early 1900s through the present.  We will examine the ways that content, structure, and style work together to convey themes, and we will explore how texts engage with—reflect, respond to, and, often, seek to change—their historical, cultural, social, and/or political contexts.  

Throughout this course, we will repeatedly engage with questions of power—who wields it, how they grant or deny legitimacy and structure society and social roles, and the discourses and institutions that support and enforce (the) social order. With an eye towards our own, current, circumstances, we will explore these questions and their implications in several texts dealing with different kinds of plagues (e.g., disease, insomnia, zombie) as a means of probing how their authors/directors represent their intersections with struggles for social justice, self-governance, autonomy, and more.   

Related themes that we will consider include:  questions of imperialism, revolution, industrialization, and the impact of modernity and modernization; and efforts to construct collective and individual identities (national, regional, racial, class, gender/sexuality). The last few weeks of the semester, we will explore representations of Caribbean identity in the diaspora—and, by extension, relations between the Caribbean nations (and their inhabitants) and the U.S. We will pay close attention to texts’ problematizations of reality and representations of time (and the implications thereof), to the challenges that texts pose to traditional roles (again, national, regional, racial, class, gender/sexuality), and to how gender, sexuality, and racial hierarchies may be reflected and refracted through private actions and political movements.   

We will also focus on strengthening writing skills, including thesis development and follow-through, analysis, and organization, among others. 

This course carries CASE AH distribution credit

HISP-S 498   #31433       9:45A-11:00A      TR       GA 0007    Prof. Deborah Cohn 

Note: This class meets with HISP-S 420 #31196.

Note: For permission to take this class, e-mail kallgood@iu.edu   

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HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                          LINGUISITICS

This course examines the sound system of the Spanish language. Topics include the articulatory system, the characteristics and description of Spanish sounds, the patterns of Spanish sounds, the historical development of modern Spanish from Latin, and the variation of the Spanish sound system. Attention will also be given to differences between Spanish and English sounds. This course will also provide students with the opportunity to improve their Spanish pronunciation through greater understanding of how the Spanish sound system works. Course evaluation is based on homework assignments, two exams, and a final course project.

This course carries CASE N & M Natural and Mathematical credit.

HISP-S 498   #13343       11:30A-12:45P      TR         BH 107       Prof. Erik Willis

Note: This class meets with HISP-S 425 #10697.

Note: For permission to take this class, e-mail kallgood@iu.edu   

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HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                           LINGUISITICS
Variable Title: The Structure of Spanish  

Prerequisite: HISP-S 326 or consent of department

In this course we study the grammatical structure of Spanish, with a focus on the structure of words (morphology) and the rule-based combination of words to form sentences (syntax). After studying the fundamental concepts of morphology with regard to the properties of lexical categories (e.g. noun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition), we analyze the ways in which words combine to form syntactic categories at the phrase level (noun phrase, verb phrase, adjectival phrase, adverbial phrase, prepositional phrase), and then at the sentence level. We analyze the syntactic and semantic properties of both simple and complex sentences. Some of the topics discussed in the course include: argument structure, word order, negation, tense and aspect, and information structure.

Student evaluation is based on class participation, weekly homework assignments, midterm and final exam, and two small research projects in which students will explore topics in morpho-syntactic variation within the Spanish speaking world.

Student evaluation is based on class participation, weekly homework assignments, midterm and final exam, and two small research projects in which students will explore topics in morpho-syntactic variation within the Spanish speaking world.

This course carries CASE N & M Natural and Mathematical credit.

HISP-S 498   #10648      4:45P-6:00P       MW       LH 030        Prof. Patricia Amaral

Note: This class meets with HISP-S 427 #10647.

Note: For permission to take this class, e-mail kallgood@iu.edu   

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HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                        LINGUISTICS
Variable Title: Pragmatics: Language in Context

Prerequisite: HISP-S 326 or consent of department

This undergraduate course introduces the basic concepts in sociolinguistics. Sociolinguistics focuses on the symbolic value of language as an expression of group identity based on region, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, age, or other ways of defining group affiliation. Notions such as speech community, sociolinguistic variable, phonological and syntactic variation, and field methods, will be included. The course also surveys other related topics such as language in contact, bilingualism and Spanish in the U.S., Spanish as heritage language, language attitudes and language identity particularly in the U.S., language and the law, language and age, and language and gender. We will focus on research examining the use of Spanish in Latin America and Spain as well as in the U.S. Class time will be divided in lectures, discussion, and analysis of problem solving cases. The evaluation will be based on participation, homework activities, experimental activities, and exams.

Goals:

After successful completion of this course, the student will:

  1. be familiar with the basic concepts of sociolinguistics studies;
  2. be able to recognize linguistic variation at different levels, including the individual,            societal, regional, and national, as well as across time;
  3. apply the basic concepts of sociolinguistic to understand research materials to be read in future linguistics courses;
  4. be able to work with data, code and use statistical analysis;
  5. acquire an ability to identify and evaluate the ways in which diversity of Hispanic communities in the United States contributes to the cultural richness of the U.S.
  6. have learned about linguistic diversity in the United States and in bilingual/multilingual communities;
  7. have the capacity to describe, distinguish, and analyze a range of values, attitudes and methods of organizing cultural and social experiences so as to understand the possibilities and limitations of their own world view and the place of minority and majority communities in the U.S.
  8. be prepared to design a small research project in sociolinguistics; this project will facilitate using vocabulary and topics, narratives and other discursive resources to identify and productively engage in the analysis of the problems and possibilities that language diversity poses for the United States in the contemporary world.
  9. be familiar with some political and social issues related to language use in the U.S. This would provide an understanding of how cultural practices including language and artifacts represent the communities that produced them and how they serve to create, refine, and blend cultures

HISP-S 498    #5717      1:15P-2:30P     TR     BH 134     Prof. Manuel Díaz-Campos            

Above class requires permission of Department For permission, e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu

Above class meets with HISP-S 429

Above class meets In Person. For more information visit https://covid.iu.edu/learning-modes/index.html

COLL (CASE) N&M Breadth of Inquiry credit

 

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Interested in this course?

The full details of this course are available on the Office of the Registrar website.

See complete course details