Readings for Honors

HISP-S498 — spring 2022

Location
Multiple
Days and Times
Multiple
Course Description

Various topics.

CASE requirements vary.


Note: There are eight sections/topics.

HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                       LITERATURE
Variable Title:  Iberian Modernities 

This HISP-S 498 #31812 meets with HISP-S 408 #31801.  This course open to student in the Spanish Honors program. For permission to register for this class, e-mail the Department at kallgood@indiana.edu

HISP-S 498   #31812   PERM      3:00P-4:15P    MW    SB 138    Prof. Rhi Johnson
Note:  This course carries CASE AH Breadth of Inquiry credit.

Description for HISP-S 408: 

In this class, we will ask what modernity is and how it was and is being created in Spain, from the 18th century to today. We will explore conceptions of otherness and resistance in relation to national identity, gender and sexuality, and the relationship between humans and their environment (urban/rural, created/natural). We will analyze changes relating to social and gender practices and institutions and read the evolution in both style and content encoded in the texts tracing the path through Modernity. Texts will range from the Enlightenment, through Romanticism and Naturalism, the end of Empire and the Spanish Civil War, Franco’s dictatorship, and Democracy and Globalization. We will read essays, poetry, and short and long form fiction. This is a discussion course based on daily reading assignments. This course taught entirely in Spanish.

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HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                              CULTURE
Variable Title:  SPANISH AMERICA:  The Cultural Context
Prerequisite:  HISP-S324 or a 300-level Spanish literature course

This HISP-S 498 #31886 meets with HISP-S 412 #31824.  This course open to student in the Spanish Honors program. For permission to register for this class, e-mail the Department at kallgood@indiana.edu

HISP-S 498   #31886    PERM     9:45A-11:00A    TR    GA 0005    Prof. Anke Birkenmaier
Note:  This course carries CASE AH Breadth of Inquiry credit and CASE GCC credit.

Description for HISP-S 412:

In this course we will study migration as a phenomenon that has shaped Latin American culture and its relationship with the United States from early on. We will read a variety of short stories, poems, and historical texts and articles, and watch films and visual artworks from the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central America to compare legal frameworks and experiences, and see how literature and art intervene in public discussions. We will look at the outcomes of migration—whether it be the formation of diaspora or exile communities, assimilation or deportation. Finally, we will study what can be called the “structure of feelings” of cultures defined by a history of migration. Class taught in Spanish.

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HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                              LITERATURE
Variable Title:  Modern Spanish Prose Fiction
Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328 or Consent of the Department

This HISP-S 498 #31891 meets with HISP-S 419 #31825.  This course open to student in the Spanish Honors program. For permission to register for this class, e-mail the Department at kallgood@indiana.edu

HISP-S 498  #31891       1:15P-2:30P    TR     BH 344    Prof. Melissa Dinverno
Note: This course carries CASE AH Breadth of Inquiry credit and CASE GCC credit.

Description for HISP-S 419:

“Contesting Repression: 20th-Century Spanish Fiction (1939-1990)”
(S419) Modern Spanish Prose Fiction

With the fascist triumph in the Spanish Civil War and the installation of the Franco Regime, Spain began one of the most complex periods of its history. The experiences of war and dictatorship have been determining factors in Spain’s cultural production through most of the twentieth century. Permeating society, their effects have lingered on long after the country’s transition to democracy was well under way in the 1980s. This course will analyze twentieth-century Spanish cultural production through the lens of repression and resistance, looking at ways intellectuals have configured and contested forces of constraint.

The first section of the course explores how artists both represented and pushed back against repression and the totalitarian state from within the system itself (1939-1975). How can those within position themselves in order to contemplate and resist a system that labels and combats both of these very acts as subversive? We will explore the kinds of spaces writers created that allowed them room for maneuver and within which they could both struggle with authority and speak of the experience as a subject of totalitarianism. The second section of the course examines the idea of contesting in terms of “response”, as the country underwent a transition to democracy and moved beyond the Franco regime (1975-1990). Here, we will look at the way these texts respond to the Franco era as an apparently past event, both reexamining that experience, and voicing a preoccupation with self-construction and defining the emergent nation. 

Within this frame, some of the issues we will discuss are (self)censorship, exile, gender and sexuality, memory, the power of writing/storytelling, and identity construction.

Class discussions and assignments will be in Spanish. Evaluation will likely be based on a combination of active participation, oral presentations, and analytical essays.

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HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                      FILM/LITERATURE
Variable Title:  Hispanic Cinema
Prerequisite:   HISP-S 322 or HISP-S 324 or HISP-S 328 or Consent of the Department

This HISP-S 498 #31899 meets with HISP-S 422 #31845.  This course open to student in the Spanish Honors program. For permission to register for this class, e-mail the Department at kallgood@indiana.edu

This course carries CASE AH Breadth of Inquiry credit.

HISP-S 498     #31899      1:15P-2:30P    MW    BH 140    Prof. Jonathan Risner
           Film Showing         6:30P-9:00P     M        WH 007

Description for HISP-S 422:

This course will provide an overview of cinemas within Spain and will encompass film’s inception in Spain at the end of the nineteenth-century through the present. Films will be paired with readings that broach particular film genres, topics, and/or concepts, which will likely include: modernity; dictatorship and memory; screen violence; gender and sexuality; regionalisms; experimental cinema; funding and production structures; cinematic allegories; transnationalism; cinematic legacies of empire; Netflix; local comedies; horror and exploitation cinemas; and home movies.

Albeit helpful, students need not have taken a prior class about cinema. Over the progression of the semester, the course will touch on formal film terms, such as framing, camera movements, and mise-en-scène, among others. Students will do homework assignments on a regular basis, develop a final paper in different phases, and write a midterm and final exam.

This course taught entirely in Spanish.

NOTE: while there is a scheduled screening time for movies, students will be able to stream all the films and do NOT need to attend the screenings.

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HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                          LINGUISITICS
Variable Title:  Spanish Phonetics
Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or Consent of the Department

This HISP-S 498 #31908 meets with HISP-S 425 #12098.  This course open to student in the Spanish Honors program. For permission to register for this class, e-mail the Department at kallgood@indiana.edu

HISP-S 498   #31908  PERM  3:00P-4:15P     TR     PH 154   Prof. Erik Willis
Note:  This course carries CASE NM, Natural & Mathematical credit.

Description for HISP-S 425:

This course studies the sound system of Spanish. Topics include the articulatory system, the characteristics and description of Spanish sounds, the patterns of Spanish sounds, the historical development of modern Spanish from Latin and the variation of the Spanish sound system. Attention will also be given to differences between Spanish and English sounds. A secondary goal of the course is a more native-like pronunciation as a result of a deeper understanding of how the Spanish sound system works. Course evaluation is based on homework assignments, a class project and presentation, and two exams.  This course taught entirely in Spanish.

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HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                           LINGUISITICS
Variable Title:  The Structure of Spanish
Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or Consent of the Department

This HISP-S 498 #11959 meets with HISP-S 427 #11958.  This course open to student in the Spanish Honors program. For permission to register for this class, e-mail the Department at kallgood@indiana.edu

HISP-S 498   #11959   PERM    11:30A-12:45P    MW    WH 119    Prof. Patricia Amaral
Note: This course carries CASE NM, Natural & Mathematical credit.

Description for HISP-S 427:

In this course, we study the grammatical structure of Spanish, with a focus on the structure of words (morphology) and the rule-based combination of words to form sentences (syntax). After studying the fundamental concepts of morphology with regard to the properties of lexical categories (e.g. noun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition), we analyze the ways in which words combine to form syntactic categories at the phrase level (noun phrase, verb phrase, adjectival phrase, adverbial phrase, prepositional phrase), and then at the sentence level. We analyze the syntactic and semantic properties of both simple and complex sentences. Some of the topics discussed in the course include argument structure, word order, negation, tense and aspect, and information structure.

Student evaluation is based on class participation, weekly homework assignments, midterm and final exam, and two small research projects in which students will explore topics in morpho-syntactic variation within the Spanish speaking world. This course taught entirely in Spanish.

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HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                        LINGUISTICS
Variable Title: Pragmatics: Language Use in Context
Prerequisite:  HISP-S 326 or Consent of the Department

This HISP-S 498 #6076 meets with HISP-S 429 #6036.  This course open to students in the Spanish Honors program. For permission to register for this class, e-mail the Department at kallgood@indiana.edu

This course carries CASE NM, Natural & Mathematical credit.

HISP-S 498   #6076   PERM   9:45A-11:00A     MW    BH 147   Prof. César Félix-Brasdefer

Description for HISP-S 429  Topic:  Pragmatics:

The objective of this course is to examine language use in context (pragmatics) and sociolinguistic variation in different varieties of Spanish. The first part of the course covers the foundational concepts of pragmatics: meaning, context, speech acts, reference, politeness/impoliteness, and discourse analysis. This course will look at grammatical concepts (conditional, subjunctive, negation, preterit/imperfect, word order, etc.) from a pragmatic perspective using data from native and non-native speakers. The second part of the course applies these notions to pragmatic and sociolinguistic variation by examining the effect of social factors (e.g. region, age, social class) on communicative language use. We will analyze data in Spanish from different sources such as colloquial conversation, institutional discourse, and controlled settings using oral and written questionnaires. Finally, students will learn the principles for writing a research paper. This course taught entirely in Spanish.

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HISP-S 498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)                          LITERATURE
Variable Title:  Democracy and Dictatorship
Prerequisite:  HISP-S 328 or Consent of the Department

This HISP-S 498 #31902 meets with HISP-S 472 #31847.  This course open to students in the Spanish Honors program. For permission to register for this class, e-mail the Department at kallgood@indiana.edu

HISP-S 498    #31902 PERM   11:30A-12:45P    TR    BH 344  Prof. Deborah Cohn
Note:  This course carries CASE AH Breadth of Inquiry credit.

Description for HISP-S 472:

The Cold War, Revolution, Counter-Revolution, and Dictatorship in Spanish American and Latinx Literature   

In this course, we will explore the ripple effect of the Cold War and revolutionary politics in Spanish America and the U.S. in works by Spanish American and Latino/a authors.  For many, the Cuban Revolution of 1959 sparked hopes of establishing political and cultural autonomy throughout Spanish America. Focusing on literary, political, and historical texts, we will examine this period, its aftermath, and its legacies, including representations and critiques of: the Cuban Revolution, its goals and impact; the cultural effervescence that emerged out of this moment; the dictatorships in and counterrevolutionary measures of the Spanish American states (often supported by U.S. Cold War policies) in their efforts to stem the spread of Communism; and U.S. interventionism and imperialism. We will examine texts within their national contexts and also focus our attention on their transnational dimension, that is, their relationships to other nations and their struggles in the Caribbean, Spanish America, and the U.S., and the diasporas that they prompted. We will examine the ways that content and structure/techniques work together in artistic texts to convey themes, and we will explore how texts engage with—reflect, respond to, and, often, seek to change—their historical, cultural, social, and/or political contexts. In addition to the Cuban Revolution, we will also examine social(ist) movements and dictatorship elsewhere in the Caribbean and in the Southern Cone in the 1960s and 1970s, as well as the Central American revolutions of the 1970s and 1980s. Readings include works by both Spanish American and Latinx authors.  Our discussions will examine Latinx writers’ constructions of themselves as transnational subjects as they assume their identities and insert their narratives into U.S. and Spanish American literature and history. This course taught entirely in Spanish.

We will read novels, short stories, poetry, and political texts, and watch films.  Authors included in the course will include Daniel Alarcón, Junot Díaz, Roberto Fernández Retamar, Achy Obejas, Heberto Padilla, Antonio Skármeta, Marta Traba, and others. 

Interested in this course?

The full details of this course are available on the Office of the Registrar website.

See complete course details